Wednesday, 24 August 2011

Consultation starts on new two-way streets for cycling in the Square Mile. Needs two minutes of your time to support.

The City of London first approved a number of one-way streets becoming two-way for cycling back in 2009.

At the time, the media and motoring organisations predicted veritable anarchy on the streets of London. 'Illegal' cyclists would mow down pedestrians, was the concern raised by the president of the AA. Which is odd, really, because the AA president has tended to be quite balanced in his views about people cycling and cycles himself. Looking back, I wonder if the press was slightly misrepresenting his views.

Fast forward to October 2010 and all the dire warnings are proved completely groundless. A report by the City of London showed that cycling has increased 60% in one year on the first routes to be made two-way for cycling. And what's more, the City Police were delighted with the success of the schemes: "There have been no reported collisions involving cyclists in the six months since the changes were implemented. The ability for cyclists to avoid busy streets will be a contributing factor in improving road safety in the City."


It's fantastic to see the City is now planning to open a further 17 streets to two-way cycling and a map of those streets is below.
Consultation on streets to be made two-way for cycling

There's plenty more information on the City of London website here.
 
There's also one key way you can help.
 
The City is consulting on these plans until 8 September. No doubt a number of people will write in with concerns and criticisms. I think two-way routes for cycling are hugely important. Some of these planned changes will open up ways to avoid nasty junctions or simply make some routes massively more direct than they are at the moment. So if you recognise any of these roads, please take a couple of minutes to write a quick email to plans@cityoflondon.gov.uk and voice your support and explain how you think these plans will make your journey safer or easier.
 

4 comments:

  1. I don't travel this way a lot, but when I do, it's almost guaranteed I'll be outfoxed by a one way system that deposits me in a dead end.

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  2. the AA president has tended to be quite balanced in his views about people cycling and cycles himself. Looking back, I wonder if the press was slightly misrepresenting his views.

    I think you have been fooled. Edmund King is a very smooth operator: everything he says seems quite reasonable and his arguments are always couched in terms of the safety of road users. But somehow he always manages to explain that because cyclists are a bunch of irresponsible scofflaws, nothing positive can ever be done for them. For the safety of the public, after all. Who would object to that?

    For example, it was Edmund King who was responsible for pushing the absurd "iPod zombie" idea a couple of years ago. I wrote this up in some detail to show how he goes about his job.

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  3. Gregory Williams24 August 2011 at 18:09

    It strikes me how useful the cycle campaigning toolkit [1] being developed by CycleStreets would be in this scenario, by objectively showing how the proposed two-way streets would improve cyclists' journeys.

    [1] http://www.cyclestreets.net/blog/category/toolkit/

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  4. Our starting point should surely be that no road restricts cycling both ways - given one-way streets/systems are wholly 4+ wheel vehicle specific phenomena - unless a really good reason exists. The logic seems unassailable, to me at least, but I would welcome other views.

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